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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 114 (some duplicates have been removed)
or the largest economy in the world. we need to get to the point of dealing with the biggest deficit in the country, the jobs deficit. to me, this bill simply put a band-aid on the problem. it did do something the president wanted to do, committed to do. he delivered on the promise to try to help protect the middle- class class. my theory is that in the next three political maneuvers that we are going to see coming up in congress, that people will start attacking the middle class. i believe this was our best opportunity to really take care long-term of the issues that we need to address to a balanced approach. >> to follow-up on that, you you voted early. you are not just waiting to see if it was going to pass and then vote no. the idea that obama kind of thatsome leverage theire, you wanted to see him fail, that he has to go back to the leverage -- that he does not have the leverage -- >> after the republicans walked away from the negotiations and tried the plan b by speaker boehner, it became clear, even after they tried to amend the senate yield that they could not do so dosh and
will probably not get much applause today, but he will restore the american economy, secure america's place in the world and his own place in history. thank you for watching "memo to the president." if you have an idea for the president, join us in the conversation online on #obamamemo on twitter or cnn.com/fareed. you can see our regular show on sundays at 10:00 a.m. and 1:00 p.m. eastern. thank you for watching. >>> the toughest issues facing america, job, gun, health care, immigration, climate change and more. frankly, can both sides agree on anything? i'll talk to obama's campaign co-chair. >> we want stuff done. we want solutions. we don't need perfection. we need progress. >> we'll talk about his legacy. >> i think he can learn from the past and he's try to do that. >> and what obama needs to do for america. >> he's swinging big. swinging for the fences. >> second-term presidencies have been filled with misspent political capital. >> this is "piers morgan tonight." >>> good evening. america has great expectations for president obama and at the same time the country is divided on issue
term, given the state of the economy, given the fact that most americans think the country is going in the wrong direction. he's been given that lucky second chance. and he campaigned well. you have to give him that. what are his challenges in the second term? >> the first thing every president has to be careful of in a second term, as margaret alluded to is overreach. there's a period after you win. your first-term policies seem to have been validated, that you look at those results and you think you're all powerful. the famous example in recent history is george w. bush. in 2005, remember he came out and did that press conference and said he had political capital and meant to spend it and the first thing he tried to do was pass a plan to reform social security that was just destroyed by the democrats, and then katrina happened. and his presidency was over by the end of 2005, at least the second term. so, you know, i spent a lot of time reporting on this the last year, talking to white house people, and they were very acutely aware of the dangers hidden in a second term. and i thin
holding the american economy hostage, and president obama says they wouldn't collect a ransom. this is "the ed show." let's get to work. >> the issue here is whether or not america pays its bills. we are not a dead beat nation. >> the president draws a line in the sand for republicans. >> they will not collect a ranson in exchange for the economy. >> on whether republicans will actually listen. one month after sandy hook, the president says he has the vice president's gun recommendations. >> my starting point is not to worry about the politics. >> but will spineless republicans kill reform? one republican threatens impeachment if the president signs an executive order on guns. dan gross of the grady campaign is here regarding comments that the nra is gearing up to sell guns. and former secretary of state colin powell calls out republicans on race. >> there is also a dark vein of intolerance. >> dr. peterson joins me to discuss the republican response. good to have you with us tonight, folks, thank you for joining us. president obama took on the single greatest threat to the ec
the entire economy. that is not how historically this has been done. that's not how we're going to do it this time. what i'm saying to you is there is no simpler solution, no ready, credible solution other than congress either give me the authority to raise the debt ceiling or exercise the responsibility that they have kept for themselves and raise the debt ceiling because this is about paying your bills. everybody -- everybody here understands this. i mean, this is not a complicated concept. you don't go out to dinner and eat all you want and then leave without paying the check. if you do, you're breaking the law. congress should think about it the same way that the american people do. now, if congress wants to have a debate about maybe we shouldn't go out to dinner next time, maybe we should go to a more modest restaurant, that's fine. that's a debate that we should have. but you don't say in order for me to control my appetites, i'm going to not pay the people who already provided me services. it's not meeting your obligations. you can't do that. that's not a credible way to run th
. >> they will not collect a ransom in exchange for not crashing the american economy. >> the republican game of chicken is over. eric cantore proposes a three-month deal on the debt ceiling. some democrats are calling it a trap. i'll ask dnc chairwoman debbie wasserman schultz what she thinks. democrats are about to drop the ball. tonight, my message to senator harry reid. plus the american people are getting ripped off by a congress that just isn't working. congressman rick nolan, there 30 years ago. he is back now and he can't believe the difference. he is wondering, are we getting paid for this? >>> is it really an admission of guilt if you don't show any remorse? >> it did not even feel wrong? >> no. it's scary. >> did you feel bad about it? >> no. even scarier. >> psychologist dr. jeffrey gardere on lance armstrong's bizarre performance last night. >> good to have you with us tonight, folks. thanks for watching. republicans surrendered today in one of his biggest fights. president obama warned republicans about taking the debt ceiling hostage. it looks like they heard the message. >> the financial
is still holding the american economy hostage, and president obama says they won't collect a ransom. this is "the ed show." let's get to work. >> the issue here is whether or not america pays its bills. we are not a deadbeat nation. >> the president draws a line in the sand for republicans. >> they will not collect a ransom in exchange for not crashing the american economy. >> tonight, congressman jim mcdermott's reaction to the president's tough talk on the debt ceiling. e.j. dion and ruth con connaught on whether the republicans will actually listen. >>> one month after sandy hook, he has the president's gun recommendations. >> will spineless republicans kill reform? one threats impeachment if the president signs an executive order on guns. dan gross of the brady campaign is here with reaction to the president's comments that the nra is joining up fear to sell guns. >>> and former secretary of state colin powell calls out republicans on race. >> there is also a dark -- a dark vein of intolerance in some parts of the party. >> dr. james peterson janes me to discuss the republican r
to carry out the agenda i campaigned on. new security for the middle class. right now our economy is growing and our businesses are creating new jobs. we are poised for a good year. if we make smart decisions in sound investments, and as long as i said on the campaign, one component to growing our economy and broadening opportunity for the middle class is shrinking our deficits in a balanced and responsible way. and for nearly two years now, i've been fighting for such a plan -- one that would reduce our deficits by $4 trillion over the next decade, which would stabilize our debt and our deficit in a sustainable way for the next decade. that would be enough not only to stop the growth of our debt relative to the size of our economy, but it would make it manageable so it doesn't crowd out the investments we need to make in people and education and job training and science and medical research -- all the things that help us grow. now, step by step, we've made progress towards that goal. over the past two years, i've signed into law about $1.4 trillion in spending cuts. two weeks ago
anything at all to you about the global economy or is it just a sign that apple is maybe a little different than it was a few years ago? >> i think that's exactly right. i think it is a more mature growth company instead of a hyper growth company. they still have 120 billion dollars on the balance sheet and growing that by about 40 billion dollars plus a year. the down side should be somewhat muted below $500. connell: don't go crazy says jeff saut on the apple stock price today. you have calmed us all down. good to talk to you. thanks a lot. >> it is a pleasure. dagen: about half -- about 25 minutes away from president obama give or take. it could give or take half hour really, holding his first press conference of the new year. why now? joining us now is an editor at forbes. that's always the critical question, if you're a journalist, it is not who what when where why but why now? what say you? >> i think he's trying to basically beat the republicans to the punch to roll out a lot of platitudes about how both sides need to come together, that he's going to lead this -- them coming togethe
to threaten to wreck the entire economy. that is not how, historically, this has been done. that's not how we're going to do it this time. [ inaudible question ] chuck, what i'm saying to you is that there is no simpler solution, no ready, credible solution other than congress either give me the authority to raise the debt ceiling or exercise the responsibility that they have kept for themselves and raise the debt ceiling. because this is about paying your bills. everybody here understands this. i mean, this is not a complicated concept. you don't go out to dinner and then, you know, eat all you want, and then leave without paying the check. and if you do, you're breaking the law. and congress should think about it the same way the american people do. you don't -- now, if congress wants to have a debate about maybe we shouldn't go out to dinner next time, maybe we should go to a more modest restaurant, that's fine. that's the debate that we should have. but you don't say, in order for me to control my appetites, i'm going to not pay the people who already provided me services. people who alre
.5 trillion input into the economy, they help to maintain our social security system. we know that we're now a majority, children majority minority are being born inn now in the united states these kids will help beef up our social security system which we have got to strengthen right now. >> so you think looking at washington, that in this second term, the first year of the second term, the approximate it can deal with such important critical economic issues like raising the nation's set ceiling, but he can also deal with comprehensive immigration reform and also deal with the issue of gun safety out there, all three of these issues, do you think the president could juggle at the same time with congress? >> i know president barack obama, that's not the real question. the answer is yes, that's not the real question, the question is request the congress. remember the last congress was the least productive congress in 50, of years, maybe longer. and this congress has got to move in another direction, they have got to be able to chew gum and walk at the same time, yes, it doesn't feel like it b
, the first priority, bob, is obviously to continue to grow the economy, focus on the middle class, and getting people in the middle class. that's the core mission of the country. we've, obviously, are beginning to recover from the recession, but we have a lot more work to do. but if you look at some-- yes, we have some political divisions in this country. there's vast support out there for balanced deficit reduction, investments in education and manufacturing, immigration reform, gun safety. so on the issues the president intends to really push and focus on, there's massive support in the country, even among republicans. let's not lose sight of that, and that's why we're going to do a better job in the second term-- while we're going to do all we can to work with congress and negotiate, to also make sure the american people are connected to what's going on here. i think to really get the kind of change here in washington the american people are going to demand it. but there is really, i think, consensus around eye lot of the issues around the country >> what about the idea the rep
lost the election, you can't just crash the economy if you don't get your way on the budget. this is, of course about the debt ceiling which smart republicans know full well is a trap for the gop. newt gingrich no stranger to setting up high-stakes showdowns with candidates, put it pretty clearly on joe. >> they have to find in the house a totally new strategy. i mean confronting -- everybody is talking about okay, now here comes the debt ceiling. i think that is frankly a dead loser, because in the end you know it is going to happen. the whole national financial system will come into washington by television and say oh, my god, this will be a gigantic heart attack, the entire economy will collapse, you guys can't be responsible. >> the only problem for john boehner and company, you couldn't just tell them they can't. they wouldn't accept that. so at the retreat this weekend, house republican leaders have been trying to coax their leaders down from the tree, not all the way, not completely on to solid ground, but maybe on a more secure branch. house majority leader eric cantor said n
of rules that have been established that are impossible to meet without doing severe damage to the economy. we're not going to put ourselves in a position where, in order to pay for the spending we have already incurred, where the two options are we were way to either profoundly hurt the economy, hurt seniors, hurt kids trying to go to college or we will blow up the economy. we will not do that. not whatever congress does. they will have to send me something that is sensible. we should not be doing this in a one-three month time when. why should we do that? where the united states of america. we cannot manage our affairs in such a way that we pay our bills and provide certainty in terms of how we pay our bills? look. i do not think anyone would consider my position on reasonable. major, i am happy to have a conversation about how we reduce our deficits. i'm not going to have a monthly or every three months conversation about whether or not we pay our bills. that in and of itself does severe damage. even the threat of default hurts our economy. it hurts our economy as we speak. if we want t
there for the president, things we haven't thought of, foreign policy crises yet to come and an economy that has been sluggish. a couple of things to realize. first of all the economy has not been in that great a shape and the president was reelected nonetheless. while eventually i think voters might get fed up with his economic stewardship, they might not. secondly whether the president wants to hold up shiny objects for the press, we know the debt ceiling fight will come to a head. we know it will be a major clash. the president wants to maintain upper hand here. not so much what you or i might think is really going on. it is what voters think is going on. how they see things. he wants to maintain his image at a reasonable, rational guy versus a, band of republicans he wants to faint as extreme, out of touch and unreasonable. jon: weill look for him to, at that conversation at this news conference. david drucker. >> that's correct. that's what it is all birks we'll have to leave it there. thanks, david. >> anytime. heather: as we wait for the news conference scheduled to take place just about 11:30
as well as the global economy. according to rex macy it is. he thinks there's a good chance that risk fears will rise and, therefore, the market will pull back. will that be the moment for investors to get in. good to see you, gentlemen. thanks so much for joining us. what are you expecting in terms of this market 2013? >> sure. well, right now we're at 1472 on the s&p. we think it's going to go marginally higher from here, but it's not going to be a smooth ride. we've got a vix at 13 and change. that's too low. that's where the complacency comes from. you see it there. as we move into the debt ceiling debate, it can be far harder to solve than the taxes, we think the market can be down for a while, and before it comes back up. >> so you're looking for a decline, and perhaps that is an entry point for some. do you agree with that? >> i think any decline is an opportunity to buy, maria. i'm very, very bullish on u.s. equities and one of the main reasons i am the u.s. energy story which i think is a story that's not being told as well as it should be. in 2012 the u.s. oil production was
, which we do a great job as the vascular system for the global economy. they build large fluid systems for petrochemical companies, energy companies, as the economy comes in, as industrial production comes back, they're well positioned. so, we're pretty constructive on the asset class, particularly because a lot of people don't seem to be all that constructive on the asset class. >> steve sax, what about you? where are you seeing the flow? what are investors particularly grav stating towards these days? >> it's till equities and all of last year, credential the first couple weeks of this year, more in particular, though, small caps and midcaps. we've started to see them out-perform large caps. that was the story of 2012, with particularly the mega caps. so, if you look at the russell 2000, the mid cap 400 versus say the s&p 500, we've not only seen more flows in those areas, but we're actually seeing the out-performance, which is also a theme i think probably continues, certainly in the first half of this year. fundamentals are really strong in u.s. equities, and that translates well g
to protect the economy. i personally believe the presidents that responsibility to protect the economy. and he can't mess around with these republicans who are threatening not to pay the bills of the country. we're not talking about spending. we're talking about paying bills that -- money that has already been spent that we're obligated to pay. there would be a ripple effect globally that would be insurmountable if we don't go down the road of paying the bills. i think the president has to draw the line there and be strong. he's got the people with him. that's the other thing. i think it's important that we focus on that. >> certainly political capital spent from getting re-elected to a second term. gregory, i want to show everybody the letter that ed mentioned that was sent to president obama on friday. in part saying, we believe you must be willing to take any lawful steps to ensure that america does not blake its promises and trigger a global economic crisis. without congressional approval, if necessary. basically recommending the 14th amendment. >> i think two important points here
on the need to reduce the deficit in a balanced way that will help the economy grow, amongst democrats on the hill, and, a few republicans, the barrier to progress here is not the president. we need to see more republicans and congress -- in congress willing to compromise, even on revenues. >> chris: they say they need to see the president willing to compromise on spending cuts and entitlement reform. >> let's look at what we offered speaker boehner. it is public. $400 billion in health care savings we offered, and $200 billion of additional cuts in domestic spending and a trillion dollars in savings and look at where we started the negotiated process and the speaker, we went more than halfway. >> chris: is the president still willing to adjust the cost of living increase for entitlements, is he still willing to raise the eligibility age for medicare? are those still on the table? >> i will not talk about specifics that may be in the package. it is will report in the discussions with speaker boehner we were willing to entertain the cost of living adjustment. but, the overall package, w
would be the united states economy and the potentially disastrous impact of failing to raise the debt ceiling brsh according to speaker boehner, the ends justify the means. in a statement yesterday, boehner asserted the consequences of failing to increase the debt ceiling are real, but so, too, are the consequences of allowing our spending problem to go unresolved. it was a response to this stern warning from the president on monday. >> they will not collect a ransom in exchange for not crashing the american economy. the financial well being of the american people is not leveraged to be used. >> if the tenor of the president's last press conference of his first term is any indication about what he expects in his second term, prepare for a bond-style showdown as the government barrels towards its borrowing limit. that said, there might exist a solution that would allow congress to do what it does best, which is to say nothing at all, and still save the economy. this do nothing approach was floated by senate minority leader mitch mcconnell in 2011, and president obama gave it a hat tip
the president's tactics those of a socialist who wanted to bring down the american economy? >> i think they would, and i appreciate your bringing the economy into it. the president did that yesterday. the more we talk about the debt ceiling after obsessing over the fiscal cliff, the more i look at the whole thing as a massive dangling the key or, you know, don't look over here at the real economy, which is where people would really like policymakers to be dealing, but look at this so-called fiscal crisis which doesn't even exist. the president very clearly, and i thought helpfully, spelled out the numbers yesterday and actually to get from where we are, given the spending cuts and tax increases that we've implemented so far, to where we need to be to stabilize the debt, is not that heavy a lift if we had a functional politics that was actually paying attention to what needs to be done instead of creating these ridiculous self-inflicted skirmishes and wounds. as you have correctly pointed out, you have even got conservatives spokespeople saying, look, this isn't going to happen, you're
debt ceiling. >> it would be a self inflicted wound on the economy, it would slow down our growth. might tip us in to recession. and ironically, would probably increase our deficit. so to even entertain the idea of this happening, of the united states of america not paying its bills, is irresponsible. it's absurd. we are not a deadbeat nation. >> thank goodness. but next, news flash, we already hit the ceiling two weeks ago. and the treasury's been using, quote, extraordinary measures to pay its bills. what does that even mean? the money shuffle can't last forever. the u.s. is out of money to pay its bills, it's already spent in less than four weeks. i have cousins that do that. they play to hold the debt ceiling hostage. aides say half the conference is ready to let the nation default. speaker boehner will school them on the real threat later this week. even a temporary extension for, say, two or three months could rattle the markets and threaten the nation's credit rating. last time they hashled out a debt deal? summer of 2011 and we ended up more than a trillion dollars in mand
and the health of the u.s. economy as hostages. >> they will not collect our ransom in exchange for crashing the american economy. the financial well-being of the american people is not leveraged to be used. the full faith and credit of the united states of america is not a bargaining chip. and they better choose quickly because time is running short. >> now, house speaker john boehner responded quickly saying house republicans will do the right thing. they will be responsible, they will meet america's obligations and make sure the government does not shut down. he tried to take that specter off the table. but this is a very tough fight that's getting more and more problematic, larry, because the president said he's going to break the habit of crisis-driven fiscal negotiations. if he's going to succeed in that, somebody is going to have to break and it may have to be soon because treasury secretary geithner said this afternoon we could hit the debt ceiling and exhaust all the extraordinary measures he's been taking as soon as one month from now. >> you know, john, 2010, 2011, the 2012 he neg
the economy. >> we talk to white house strategist david plouffe and our powerhouse roundtable, abc's george will, matthew dowd and cokie roberts plus former michigan governor, jennifer granholm, for the democrats and former presidential candidate rick santorum for the republicans. ♪ plus, how will the inaugural set the tone for the second term? we ask the star co-chairing the president's committee. eva longoria joins us live. >>> hello again, and welcome to inauguration day. it is, in fact, today. the constitution says a president's term ends at noon on january 20th, and the official proceedings have already begun. just moments ago, vice president biden took the oath at the naval observatory. supreme court justice sonia sotomayor swearing him in and just before noon chief justice john roberts will swear in president obama, a small private ceremony at the white house in advance of tomorrow's public event. about 800,000 expected right there at the national mall tomorrow far fewer than turned out four years ago for the first inaugural for president obama even everything just about set on the
spend on everything from education to public safety less as a share of the economy that has been true for a generation. that is not a recipe for growth. we have to do more to stabilize the finances over the medium and long-term, and also spur more growth in the short term. i have said i am hoping to making modest adjustments to programs like medicare to protect them for future generations. i also said we need more revenue for tax reform by closing loopholes for the wealthiest americans. if we combine a balanced package of savings from spending on health care and revenues from closing loopholes, we consult the deficit issue without sacrificing our investments in things like education that are going to help us grow. it turns out the american people agree with me. they listened to an entire year's debate over this issue, and they made a clear decision about the approach they prefer. they do not think it is fair to ask a senior to pay more for his or her health care or a scientist to shut down like that saving research so that a multi millionaire investor can take less in tax rates then a
provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: battle lines were drawn at either end of pennsylvania avenue today over the national debt and government spending. the opening shots came from president obama at his white house news conference. >> i thought it might make sense to take some questions this week as my first term comes to an end. >> brown: the questions were dominated by the looming debt ceiling fight. the president sternly warned republicans not to balk at raising the nation's borrowing limit. >> they will not collect a ransom in exchange for not crashing the american economy. the financial well being of the american people is not leverage to be used. the f
tomorrow? >> there's atmospheric differences. we had an economy collapsing all around us and he was a first term president and still putting together his team and agenda and cabinet and still the economy is too weak but recovering and the question is right now building on that as opposed to simply trying to stem the bleeding. there's a big difference and i think the experience of the office, as you know, you know, that helps a lot and so i think he does have even more sure-footedness in his approach. >> it can become a bit of a burden. historians write about the second term curse and i know you and your team spent a lot of time studying how to avoid that. what's the key? >> well, i think, listen, if you look at president clinton's second term, he made significant progress on balanced budgets and ronald reagan accomplished tax reforms. >> even if they're dealing with other problems. >> and we have been fortunate to be scandal-free and we want to continue that, but if you look, it's not like we're roaming around the west wing looking for things to do. right now in front of congress and the co
for new jobs, new opportunities and new security for the middle class. right now, our economy is growing. and our businesses are creating new jobs. so, we are poised for a good year. if we make smart decisions and sound investments. and as long as washington politics don't get in the way of america's progress. as i said on the campaign, one component to growing our economy and broadening opportunities for the middle class is shrinking deficits in a balanced and responsible way. and for nearly two years now, i have been fighting for such a plan. one that would reduce our deficits by $4 trillion over the next decades. which would stabilize our debt and deficit in a sustainable way for the next decade. that would be enough not only to stop the growth of our debt relative to the size of our economy but it would make it manageable so that it does not crowd out the investments we need to make in people, education, job training, science, medical research. step by step, we made progress towards that goal. over the past two years, i have signed into law about $1.4 trillion in spending cuts. two w
for new jobs, new opportunity and new security for the middle class. now, right now our economy is growing and our businesses are creating new jobs. so we are poised for a good year. if we make smart decisions and sound investments. and as long as washington politics don't get in the way of america's progress. as i said on the campaign, one component to growing our economy and broadening opportunity for the middle class is shrinking our deficits in a balanced and responsible way. and for nearly two years now, i've been fighting for such a plan, one that would reduce our deficits by $4 trillion over the next decade, which would stabilize our debt and our deficit in a sustainable way for the next decade. that would be enough not only to stop the growth of our debt relative to the size of our economy, but it would make it manageable so it doesn't crowd out the investments we need to make people and education and jobs and science research. step by step, we've made progress towards that goal. over the past two years i've signed into law about $1.4 trillion in spending cuts. two weeks ago i sign
for the fuel or these doctors will get paid, you know, government is a huge force in our economy. like it or not. and the number of companies that would really be affected from walmart to every defense contractor to giant health care companies, if their ability to collect money that is owed to them is then put in doubt, that triggers a whole, you know, range of activities of other people wanting to collect debts from them. >> sounds really scary. do me a favor, though, and crawl in to president obama's head for me and tell me why you think in 2006 he voted not to raise the debt ceiling and said the fact we're here today to debate raising the debt limit is a sign of leadership failure, the sign the u.s. government can't pay his own bills. what was he thinking there? >> voting against an increase of the debt kreeling is what you do in the opposition party. >> oh, okay. >> in congress. this is going back for the last many years. >> yeah. >> all the republicans in the senate voted for increases when bush was in office. they vote against it when obama is in office. and vice versa. the probl
much for that election day euphoria... >> the economy has now lost 650,000 jobs just in the past three months... >> all eyes are now on barack obama to turn it around... >> narrator: the cascade of bad news began with the economy. >> fear swept through the markets... >> he had to start thinking about this the day after he was elected. >> this was the most eventful and consequential presidential transition in american history. >> we were all worried about what we were seeing. we knew that the credit system was pretty quickly headed towards something that looked a lot like seizure. >> narrator: the president-elect was told that in the two months since lehman brothers crashed, the panic on wall street had only gotten worse. >> what we were facing was something that, really, he had never contemplated, never experienced. >> narrator: unemploymenwas nearly seven percent and climbing. the stock market was down more than 6,000 points. >> there was a growing sense of calamity. this could be the most climactic economic crisis in all of american history, that we were that close to a complete melt
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 114 (some duplicates have been removed)